Monthly Archives: November 2013

Interview on Liberty Underground Show

Fair DUI author and founder Warren Redlich was interviewed this morning on the Liberty Underground Show on the 1787 Network. The video is below, showing the hosts. The interview with Warren (appearing by phone only) starts around 27 minutes and 30 seconds in.

Thanks to Alexander Snitker for putting us on the show. He is a leader of the Libertarian Party in Florida.

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Flyer and Book

Thanks for all the comments, likes, etc. We are inspired by the recent attention (January 2015) and will be adding several states. We hope to complete the country within a couple months.


There are two main reasons people come to Fair DUI: Our flyer and our DUI book. Here’s an example of the flyer:
Fair-DUI-FL-Flyer-1

The idea behind the flyer is that you keep it in your car and show it to police at checkpoints and traffic stops. This is NOT for everyone, nor for every situation. To find out whether the flyer is for you, and when you should (and shouldn’t) use it, please read more on our Flyer page.

fair-dui-kindleTo better understand police encounters and how to protect yourself, you should consider buying the Fair DUI book. At this writing (February 2015), the book has 32 reviews on Amazon with an average of 4.7 stars out of 5.

1. On Kindle as low as 99 cents! 2. Paperback from Amazon
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Fair DUI Flyer in Action

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We’re pleased to report that the Fair DUI Flyer has been successfully used at a DUI checkpoint in Florida. See the video from Jeff Gray on his Honor Your Oath YouTube Channel, below:

The card is displayed in the video initially at 40 seconds in.

The first pass through the checkpoint begins at 2:16 in.

There’s more in the video but those are the key points.

We enjoyed seeing them in action but have a couple of suggestions about how to use them in the future.

The driver opened the window a crack, handed his license to the officer, and spoke with him. This is not what I recommend.

First, the idea behind remaining silent is that you remain silent. That means not talking – not a single word. While that may make the encounter more uncomfortable (both for you and the officer), I really mean it. The moment you say a single word you give the officer the opportunity to claim that your speech is impaired, slurred, or otherwise an indication of intoxication. They will use that as an excuse to elevate the level of the encounter and get you out of the car for a more involved (and unpleasant) investigation.

Even if your speech is fine, some officers will claim it wasn’t. And even if you’ve recorded the encounter, this issue is resolved by a judge, not a jury. In my experience judges may accept an officer’s word over the sound quality of a recording. But it’s much harder for a judge to find the officer credible if he claims you had impaired speech and the recording shows you didn’t say anything at all.

Second, you should not open your window at all. In the video the driver does so to hand his license to the officer and also to be better able to record the officer’s voice for the recording. You do not have to hand your license to the officer in Florida, and the same is true in New York, California and at least a few other states (check with lawyer in your home state to be sure). The law only requires you to show, display, or exhibit your documents to the officer. So you can press these items up against the window so the officer can see them. It’s a good idea to have them ready so that you don’t have to look around for them.

Similar to the “impaired speech” issue, once you open your window the officer can claim he smelled something from the inside of your car. Your video and audio recording is incapable of contradicting that. The way I usually hear officers say it in court: “I detected the odor of alcoholic beverage.”

It’s often phony. Who talks like that? And what is the “odor of alcoholic beverage”? Because the various forms of such drinks smell quite different. When I ask police on the stand what it smelled like, the most common answer they give is: “It smelled like alcohol.” On further questioning they’ll admit that alcohol is odorless. Fun for me as your lawyer, but if you get to that point you’re not a happy camper.

Do not give police the opportunity to create evidence against you. Keep both your mouth and your window shut.

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Fair DUI is an Amazon Top 20 Bestseller

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Thanks to Amazon’s recent promotion, Fair DUI has become a Top 20 best seller in the Criminal Law category of the Kindle store.

See for yourself: Fair DUI on Amazon. Amazon offers a free look inside the book. Read the reviews – the most positive reviews of any DUI book.

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Amazon Promotes Kindle Edition of Fair DUI

fair-dui-kindleWe just got this notice from Amazon:

Hello from Kindle Direct Publishing,

Your Kindle Countdown Deals promotion for “Fair DUI: Stay safe and sane in a world gone MADD” is set to begin on November 11, 2013 at 1:00:00 AM PST.

The Kindle edition of Fair DUI will be on sale for a few days for $0.99, down from the regular price of $2.99. After a few days the price will rise to $1.99, and then go back to the $2.99 price. Under the author’s agreement with Amazon, the price normally cannot go below $2.99, so this is an unusual event that will probably not happen again for a while.

Buy it here starting Monday morning: Fair DUI on Kindle

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